Bellflower
Fiction Feature
$10 online or at the door.
Friday Jul 15, 2011
8:00PMDoors Open
8:30PMLive Music by The Hairs
9:00PMFilm Begins
10:45PMQ&A with filmmaker Evan Glodell
11:30PMAfterparty at Bar Matchless, 557 Manhattan Avenue (at Driggs), Brooklyn, NY 11222
IN THE CASE OF RAIN THE EVENT WILL BE HELD INDOORS AT THE SAME LOCATION. RESTRICTIONS: NO REFUNDS. SEATING IS FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. PHYSICAL SEATS ARE LIMITED. THIS MEANS YOU MAY NOT GET A CHAIR. YOU ARE WELCOME TO BRING A BLANKET AND SIT PICNIC-STYLE, BUT NO ALCOHOL IS PERMITTED.

VENUE
Greenpoint High School For Engineering and Automotive Technology (Formerly Automotive High School)
(On the lawn)
On The Lawn
Williamsburg
50 Bedford Ave. at North 13th St., Brooklyn, NY 11222
L to Bedford Ave. or G to Nassau Ave.

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This Show Presented in Partnership With
indieWIRE
Snag Films
Time Warner Cable
IFC
New York Magazine
Oscilloscope Pictures
Vulture
NY Premiere

Rooftop Films, indieWIRE, and SnagFilms celebrate the 15 year anniversaries of Rooftop and indieWIRE with a special sneak preview of this apocalyptic love story for the Mad Max generation. Evan Glodell’s impressive feature debut paints a classic, yet urgently contemporary, tale of the destructive power of love. Bellflower opens in theaters August 5th.


40 years ago, when people first started throwing around the term “independent film,” they were usually talking about films like Bellflower—wild, anarchic films made by rebellious young filmmakers who weren’t worried about pissing someone off or fitting into some pre-determined niche. In that sense, Bellflower is a throwback. But because it doesn’t look or feel like any other film you have ever seen, it is also a breath of fresh air—and that air is heated to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit and racing out the nozzle of a homemade flamethrower. Filmmaker Evan Glodell will be at the show in person to answer for a Q&A after the film.

“Enjoyably badass, with a plot that’s like one long, drunken dare”
--The Onion AV Club


THE FILMS

Bellflower (Evan Glodell | USA | 103 min.)
Bellflower follows two friends as they venture out into the world to begin their adult lives. All their free time is spent building weapons of mass destruction, hoping that a global apocalypse will occur and clear the runway for their imaginary gang. While waiting for the world to end, their call to excitement comes unexpectedly when one of them meets a charismatic young woman and falls hard in love. Quickly integrated into a new group of friends, they set off on a journey of betrayal, love, hate, infidelity and extreme violence more devastating and fiery than any of their apocalyptic fantasies.

Glodell takes lots of chances in his wild, boozy, twisted feature film debut, and at times it seems like he is reconfiguring the direction of the film every twenty minutes or so. But the daring visuals of Bellflower (shot on a hand-made camera designed specifically for this project) remain thrillingly innovative and arresting, and the visual logic of the film holds the movie together even when the narrative threads of the tale fly wildly in one direction and then the other.

It’s a story about a couple that meet at an insect eating contest and it’s a buddy movie about best friends who build flamethrowers and install whiskey dispensers in their hot rods. It’s about love and infidelity and friendship and betrayal, about sex and fire and brain damage and revenge; it’s about the false myth of the state of California and it’s about wild young men who self-mythologize until they destroy whatever it was they believed they wanted to become in the first place. When you consider all that, you realize that Bellflower is a chaotic MESS of a film. But it is a gorgeous/grotesque and well-considered mess, and it isn’t boring for a second. Glodell clearly knew he was making a wildly unconventional film right from the beginning, and not only did that not bother him–it got him really, really excited. That reckless enthusiasm explodes off the screen from start to finish, and that’s why any screening of Bellflower is one of the most exciting film-going events of the year.

If you like your Friday nights safe, then maybe Bellflower isn’t your type of movie. But if you like your weekend evenings a little messy, with the potential for gloriously colorful explosions, then you are making a mistake if you don’t check out Bellflower as soon as you get the chance.

- Dan Nuxoll

MUSIC

The Hairs
"Brooklyn’s the Hairs remind me of something you’d find on a Blue Tongue cassette in the mid ’90s. Or, to update the reference — Knight School-er Kevin Alvir’s brief home-recorded pop songs sound like a twee Wavves, a less punked-up but still snotty Cloud Nothings … or to go back again, an extremely polite Happy Flowers. The self-penned bio helps, too: “The Hairs is a pop band led by Kevin (words & gtr). Alex comes around and plays some bass sometimes. The Hairs is cool.” Alex being Alex Naidus of Pains Of Being Pure At Heart, another touchstone, but this stuff is sillier, as you’ll note before listening via playfully naive song titles like “Duh! x 12,” “Vikings, Pirates, & Dudes,” “Houseplant Song,” or this one, “Balding College Girls.” - Stereogum

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Rooftop Films is a New York based non-profit whose mission is to engage diverse communities by showing independent movies in outdoor locations, producing new films, coordinating youth media education, and renting equipment at low cost to artists.


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